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© 2018 by Nisha Jackson

*this degree is from an unaccredited college and is not approved for use in Oregon

  • Nisha Jackson, PhD

Neurotransmitters and Stress Response

The thing that really blows my mind is that millions of women are suffering silently from anxiety, low-lying depression, brain scramble, cravings, and loss of memory to the point that they think they really do have dementia or Alzheimer’s. Apparently, we have an epidemic on our hands with a skyrocketing number of people suffering from these disorders, but women in particular are hardly ever offered a thorough evaluation of their brain chemicals or even a discussion on what might be happening with them. Instead, they are usually prescribed an antidepressant. These women are told, “See you in a few months” and are referred to counseling. Really? That’s the best we can do?


When it comes to the brain, most psychiatrists and general practitioners focus on depression and medications to fix the ailments or symptoms of it but rarely look at the entire person to figure out what needs to be done to fix the underlying issues. Where they should be looking is at the neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are vitally important in the stress response because they allow us to cope with everyday stressors with a clear mind, they promote good mental performance, and they grant us the needed motor skills to move through our day with a balanced emotional outlook.


Everyone suffers from intermittent blues or feeling down, but increased, ongoing high stress can compromise the integrity of the brain’s neurotransmitter balance. This leaves you with a serious deteriorated emotional and mental state that can create day-to-day concerns and an inability to cope. Anxiety and depression often occur when you know that the demands from your environment are greater than your capacity to deal with them. High, daily occurring stress causes you to feel worse emotionally. Mentally, you are not reacting as you normally would, and your neurotransmitters are likely off balance. Unfortunately, if this imbalance is not dealt with, it can destroy your entire sense of well-being over time.



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